Follow the Sunflower

A couple of weeks ago, when we were coming home from a week-long international camporee, we happen to drove by a sunflower farm here in Iowa. We were unaware that there’s a sunflower field here. Since we were all tired from the camping, we did not go down to check it out, but promised ourselves that we’ll come back and visit it some other time.

Last Friday, after we helped our daughter get settled back to her dorm, we trekked down to the sunflower farm, which was less than an hour drive from our daughter’s university.

When we arrived at the field, we were a little disappointed, as the condition of the sunflowers has passed its peak. Summer after all, is almost ending and plus the heavy rains earlier in the week did a number on the sunflowers. In fact some of the sunflowers had already fallen to the ground.

Since the state of the farm was not that picture perfect anymore, the $3 entrance fee had been waived, and instead a box for voluntary donation at the gate was placed. It was also free to take some flowers home.

I have to say though that overall, peak or past their peak, the sunflowers were still a beauty to behold.

I noticed something peculiar as well. I always heard that sunflowers always face and follow the sun from sunrise to sunset. This phenomenon is called heliotropism. However in this field the flowerheads were actually turned away from the sun as they were facing east, though the sun was already starting to descend in the west. Why?

I asked one of the farm attendant and she told us that young sunflowers follow the sun across the sky, but when the plant mature, the stalks become stiff already so they lost their ability to turn. So the mature sunflowers face east permanently the rest of their days.

Isn’t that like people? When we were young, we were impressionable and we follow rules without questions. But when we get old, we become “stiff neck” and become pasaway (hardheaded).

Speaking of pasaway, here’s one:

watering the sunflowers

Don’t worry, I did not really “water” the sunflowers. It was all for photo effects.

For some reason while I was on this field, I had this certain Beatles song playing in my head. Maybe because I know that the sunflowers follow the sun:

One day, you’ll find
That I have gone
But tomorrow may rain, so
I’ll follow the sun
Yeah tomorrow may rain, so
I’ll follow the sun.

From the sunflower field of Iowa,

Pinoytransplant

(*photos taken with an iPhone)

Weight on My Shoulder

Ever since I have chosen this career, I have this feeling of weight on my shoulder every time I am at work. There’s always something around my neck.

It’s not that I feel like Atlas, the Titan in Greek mythology who was condemned to hold up the sky for eternity. No, nothing like carrying the world on my shoulder.

I know this profession can be stressful. And in fact it is always in the top 10 of most stressful jobs in the world. Though it may not be as much stress as police officers, fire fighters, and enlisted military personnel.

On the other hand, at least our profession is handsomely compensated. I agree though that the salary for police officers, fire fighters and the military should be increased, for the services they provide and the risks they take just to perform their duties.

But this weight on my shoulder and this feeling of something hanging around my neck could be a badge of pride as well. A symbol of our profession if you will.

Come to think of it, there may be other ways to bear this, but this is the easiest way to carry this load. That is around our neck. Thus I would always carry this weight on my shoulder, perhaps until I change career or until I retire.

Like what the Beatles’ song say:

Boy, you gotta carry that weight,
Carry that weight a long time,
Boy, you gonna carry that weight,
Carry that weight a long time.

If you’re wondering what is this weight on my shoulder?

I am just pertaining to the stethoscope that I always carry around my neck when I am working.

Were you thinking of the load of responsibility that we are burdened with? Well, that too. Especially when we’re in charge of the ICU.

By the way a stethoscope only weighs 6 ounces, which is not even half a pound. Unlike the taho vendor in the Philippines who has to carry that enormous weight on their shoulders as they go through streets after streets, just to make a living.

I really have nothing to complain about.

 

Cold Break

After being cooped up indoors for too long due to bitter cold, I finally went out today. And ran!

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most of the ground snow have melted away

Yeah, it was a bit chilly as we only peaked in the high 40’s to low 50’s Fahrenheit (and will dip below freezing tonight), but still, that was about 50 degrees warmer than 2 days ago.

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the pond was still icy

Today, I ran my first 5K (yes, I was slacking for months!) for this year. Albeit a little slower pace. OK, much slower than I use to. But hey, who’s watching?

Even if I was running slow, I was still chasing my breath. Do you suppose my breath was running faster than I was? Yet it was just exhilarating to be outside. To feel the wind in my face, the sunshine in my eyes, and the sweat in my brows. Even though I was panting and my legs were heavy, it is good to be alive!

I saw friendly neighbors outside as well. Some were walking their kids. Some were walking their dog. Some were walking themselves. Huh? And some were just sitting on their porch. All waved as I passed them by. So it was not just me who took advantage of this break from the winter blast.

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“tomorrow may rain (*snow*), so I’ll follow the sun” ….Beatles

I know winter is not officially over. And who knows what old Iowa winter still has in its sleeves? For arctic air can blow back and we can still have snow the next day, or the next week, or even the next month.

But this I know, spring is coming.