Crown Jewels

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(This is #8 of the presentations for the series “Fashion Statements: Lessons from Garments in the Bible.”)

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We cannot discuss fashion without including jewelries. Among the jewelries, the most iconic and perhaps the most expensive too are the crowns.

Kings and queens of England have stored crowns, robes, and other items of their ceremonial regalia at the Tower of London for over 600 years. Since the 1600s, the coronation regalia itself, commonly known as the ‘Crown Jewels’ have been protected at the Tower.

The most expensive and arguably the most famous crown jewel in the world is St. Edward’s Crown.It includes 345 aquamarines, 37 topazes, 27 tourmalines, 12 rubies, 7 amethysts, 6 sapphires, 2 jargoons, 1 garnet, 1 spinel, and 1 carbuncle. Experts have valued St. Edward’s Crown at 40 million dollars. St. Edward’s Crown was worn by Queen Elizabeth II during her precession in 1953, but since then has very rarely worn it. The reason for this is because of the weight, which the Queen said makes looking down when reading a speech nearly impossible.

St. Edward’s Crown

Crowns are emblem of power and legitimacy. They are symbol of supreme authority of monarchs and rulers throughout history. Wearing a crown is also a sign that you have conquered something and has become victorious.

When King David defeated the Ammonites, he literally took the Ammonite king’s crown and wore it upon his head.

And David gathered all the people together, and went to Rabbah, and fought against it, and took it. And he took their king’s crown from off his head, the weight whereof was a talent of gold with the precious stones: and it was set on David’s head. And he brought forth the spoil of the city in great abundance. – 2 Samuel 12:29-30     

So even during the Old Testament days, the crowns of the kings are lavish and expensive. You and I are not royalty, and the likelihood of us wearing a crown here on Earth is close to impossible. But we all look forward that someday in Heaven, we will. We even have a popular children song that we sing that goes like this:

I will wear a crown, in my Father’s house, in my Father’s house, in my Father’s house.

I will wear a crown, in my Father’s house, there’ll be joy, joy, joy.

There’s a question that maybe some of us will refuse to wear a crown in heaven. Why? We may claim that that goes against our beliefs and that we don’t wear expensive jewelries. Don’t worry brothers and sisters, our crowns will have a clock on it, so we can wear it without guilt. I’m joking.

In the olden days, an Olympian who won an event would receive a laurel wreath crown. These crown may just be made of branches with leaves and lack precious stones or jewels, but the meaning is still one of great accomplishment and personal glory.

The apostle Paul said in 2 Timothy 4:7-8

I have fought the good fight, I have finished the course, I have kept the faith;  in the future there is laid up for me the crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous Judge, will award to me on that day; and not only to me, but also to all who have loved His appearing.

Someday we will wear a crown of righteousness. Someday we will wear a crown of victory. Someday we will wear a crown of glory. But it is not because of our own merits. It is because of our Saviour Jesus Christ.

Jesus wore a crown of thorns. It was most likely made from branches of a plant that has spiny thorns that the Roman soldiers made. It was a crown of ridicule and embarrassment. Matthew 27:29 said:

And they twisted together a crown of thorns and set it on his head. They put a staff in his right hand. Then they knelt in front of him and mocked him. “Hail, king of the Jews!” they said. 

That crown of thorns pierced our Savior’s brows. That crown of thorns wounded His head. That crown of thorns caused Him to bleed in pain. And for me, that is the most precious crown in all of history.

Jesus wore the crown of thorns and gave His life, so you and I will someday wear the crown of Everlasting Life.

(*photo from pinterest.com)

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