Chilled

Last week, my partners and I went to a fancy restaurant in town. We have a candidate who is applying to join our practice that we interviewed so we took him to a place, a little pricey,  but reputable, especially when it comes to steak and chops. We don’t want to have an applicant think that we are cheap.

I am not really in to steak and chops, but after tasting their food, I would say that this restaurant have a valid reason to claim that their steak is the best in town.

Besides the entrée, some other small things are remarkable. The fresh sea food platter appetizer was nicely presented and decorated in a bucket full of ice. The drinks were cold and chilled. Those were expected, I suppose.

However, when I excuse myself from the group and went to the restroom, I found something else that was “cool.” This one I was not expecting.

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Do you see it? I know their urinals are not really swanky nor high-tech, yet it is classy. Though, I’m pertaining to something else.

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Yes, you got it. Those are ice cubes in the urinals! Why they put ice in there, I have no clue.

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I guess they chill the appetizers, the drinks, and yes, even the pee. Cool!

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Post Note:

After searching the web, I found out why restaurants and bars put ice on the urinals. No, it’s not to chill the pee. But ice is a cheaper alternative to the urinal cake. When the ice melts it flushes the urine, so no need of auto-flush. Plus, the restaurants have a lot of supply of ice anyway, and it is easier to toss the used ice, like those in their fresh sea food platter, in the urinal than tossing them outside. And lastly, it gives the men (sorry ladies, you may never understand this) something to aim for when they take a leak.

I really learned something from this post. I hope you did too.

 

Farm Dining

Since we moved in Iowa several years ago, we have dined in different restaurants here in metro Des Moines area. From formal to casual, from fancy to rustic, from pricey to low-cost, and from long-sit-down meal to on-the-run fast food. This also encompassed several international cuisines, like American, Chinese, Mexican, Thai, Italian, French, Vietnamese, Laotian, Korean, Japanese, Mongolian, Indian, Greek, Ecuadorian, and Lebanese.

We also enjoy Filipino cuisine here, but it is not in a restaurant. It is my wife’s home cooking.

But when you’re in Iowa, I believe there’s a restaurant that embodies this state’s culture. The restaurant is the Iowa Machine Shed.

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The ambience is farm-themed, and the dining experience is relaxed, warm and family oriented. The establishment prides itself as a restaurant that honors the American farmer.

Outside the restaurant are some old farming equipments that adds to its distinctive appeal.

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my son on the tractor

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old gasoline pump

They even have a complimentary tractor ride that takes you around the neighborhood of the restaurant, and let you catch a glimpse of the “Living History Farm*” next door, that the restaurant supports.

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tractor ride

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Since the state of Iowa is the number one producer of pork and corn in the US, and probably the whole world, so it is not surprising these are what greets you at the door.

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Inside the place, they have a small store that you can browse through while you wait to be seated.

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The dining area, the tables and chairs, gives you a feel of a farmer’s kitchen or even a barn.

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The waiters and waitresses are in their denim overalls, that I wonder if they are dressed to harvest the corn and milk the cow, as well as to serve us our food.

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Even the silverware and glassware are uniquely farm-like: sturdy and rustic. Here’s what my son did to the glass, knives and the water pitcher. Good balancing act!

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I know that the most important part of the restaurant is the menu and the food it offers. Of course this restaurant serves lots of bacon and pork chops. But I assure you, they offer more than pork chops and corn on the cob.

I don’t have any photos of the food they serve on this post, for I intentionally left them out for you to come and visit, and personally see and try them for yourselves.

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Lastly, when you dine here, appreciate all the farmers and all the people and their efforts that brought food to your table. And besides there is a sign near the counter that says, “complaining to the cook will be hazardous to your health.”

From Iowa,

Pinoytransplant.

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(*Living History Farm is an outdoor museum in Iowa that tells the story of how Iowans transformed the fertile prairies of the Midwest into the most productive farmland in the world.)

(**This is not a paid post. But on second thought, maybe they should give me a free meal on our next visit. Just wishful thinking.)

Slow Place, Quick Opinion

I drove to southern Iowa a few days ago to my new outreach clinic, which is about 70 miles (1 hour and 15 minutes drive) from Des Moines. After seeing all my patients there in the morning, I headed then to my other outreach clinic (still in southern Iowa) for the afternoon, which is about 30 minutes away from the first one. I visit these satellite clinics, outside of Des Moines, once every other month. (Most specialty clinics from bigger cities in Iowa reach out to many surrounding small towns to provide services.)

On the way to my afternoon clinic, since it was lunch time, I decided to get food. I passed a small rural town (estimated population: a couple of thousand people) and searched for a place to eat. I looked for something familiar and a restaurant that I knew would be accepting credit card, as I had only a few dollars in cash. Come to think of it, I rarely carry more than $20 in my wallet, as I exist by the swipe of the card.

small Iowa town (photo from New York Times)

I saw a Subway franchise restaurant and stopped there for lunch. The place is quite small and I thought to myself, since it was a small town, it must be a “slow” place. I wondered how can this franchise survive in this “remote” place. Sure enough, when I entered, there was no body sitting in the tables, though there were 2 people in the counter placing their order to-go, ahead of me. That would be OK, I would be eating in my lonesome, but at least a quiet meal.

After I got my order, I sat by the window in an empty restaurant all by myself.  However, I soon observed that one after another, cars started pulling up in the parking lot. A wave of people came trickling in non-stop. In a short period of time, the restaurant was bustling and full of people, and I felt like I was in a crowded downtown joint. Must be a popular place to eat. What did they do, invite the whole community for a lunch party?

As I left the place, there were several people seated in the tables, and there were 42 people (yes, I counted them!) in line, waiting to make their order. A “slow” place huh?

How many times do we quickly form our opinion and judgement on many things, just based on our first impression? And many times it turns out to be wrong.